Glenlee was built in 1896 in Anderson Rodger's Bay Yard in Port Glasgow.  She was the twenty-sixth of 120 vessels built by Rodger between 1891 and 1909, and by the end of the nineteenth century it was almost a production line method.  

Glenlee was made of steel manufactured or rolled locally in Lanarkshire. It took about six months to complete the ship using the skills of many different tradesmen, who were masters in the building of a wind-driven cargo ship, built to carry large loads cheaply over long distances. During her build she was known as Hull 324.

The Launch of Glenlee - 3 December 1896 at the Bay Yard, Port Glasgow

The Launch of Glenlee - 3 December 1896 at the Bay Yard, Port Glasgow

To build a ship such as Glenlee required a host of trades: draughtsmen, platers, riveters, blacksmiths, shipwrights, carpenters, riggers, painters and labourers all had their parts to play.  To find out more about how steel ships (particularly rivetted sailing ships) were made, read the book "Glenlee: How a riveted sailing ship is built" by Ian Ramsay.  Ian is a former Trustee of The Clyde Maritime Trust and started his time in the Pointhouse Shipyard of A & J Inglis Limited (Where Riverside Museum is today).  This book explains all about how these vessels were built. Copies are available in the Shop.

Also on board you may view Gerald Wingrove's 'Falls of Clyde' model.  Gerald was a world renowned maker of model cars.  He then turned his skill to making a model of Falls of Clyde.  He did this by making a shipyard in miniature, with the half model, the lofting floor, and he made a rivetted vessel out of brass.  It is an outstanding feat that brings shipyards of the time very much closer.